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Sustainable Streets programme

Our Sustainable Streets programme aims to create better streets for residents and reduce traffic and pollution.

Our Sustainable Streets programme aims to create better street for residents, reduce the number of car journeys made in Lewisham and encourage more people to walk, cycle or use public transport, in order to reduce traffic and pollution, improve road safety and lower carbon emissions.

With unrestricted parking on 75% of our roads – the highest of any inner London borough – improving parking management and introducing more sustainable transport measures are both crucial for reducing the number of unnecessary car journeys and tackling traffic, congestion and pollution.

We are proposing to introduce new parking permit schemes to discourage unnecessary journeys and ensure on-street parking is prioritising for local residents and businesses, helping reduce traffic, congestion and pollution. 

Alongside the introduction of parking permit schemes, our Sustainable Streets programme proposes a series of improvements to local streets and investment in sustainable transport measures, including more street trees, safer crossing points, electric vehicle charging points, secure cycle storage and car club bays. 

As well as reducing unnecessary car journeys, the introduction of parking permit schemes will provide the space and funding needed to invest in these sustainable transport measures and improvements to local streets.

Our Sustainable Streets programme is being rolled out in phases across the borough, with local residents and businesses in different parts of the borough consulted on proposals for their area.

Phase 1: Catford and Crofton Park

We consulted people in Catford and Crofton Park on proposals for their area in Spring 2023. The introduction of a parking permit scheme for roads in Catford and Crofton Park was proposed to help alleviate parking pressures in the area and ensure parking is prioritised for local residents and businesses, as well as discouraging unnecessary car journeys and reducing traffic and congestion. Alongside the introduction of a parking permit scheme, we proposed a series of improvements to local streets and the introduction of more sustainable transport measures in Catford and Crofton Park. The proposals included new street trees, safer crossing points, electric vehicle charging points, secure cycle storage and car club bays.

The results of the consultation and updated recommendations were presented to Mayor and Cabinet on 19 July 2023, taking into account feedback received during the consultation. Mayor and Cabinet approved proposals to roll out the programme in full in two smaller areas in Catford and Crofton Park - on two roads around Honor Oak Park station (on Ballina Street and Grierson Road, up to junction of Parbury Road) and three roads around Ravensbourne Park (on Chilthorne Close, Ravensbourne Park and Ravensbourne Park Crescent). Proposals were also approved to introduce double yellow lines at junctions on all the roads which formed part of the Phase 1 consultation zone in Catford and Crofton Park, helping to improve road safety in this area.

View the plans for Chilthorne Close, Ravensbourne Park and Ravensbourne Park Crescent.

View the plans for Ballina Street and Grierson Road.

View the roads where double yellow lines will be introduced at junctions in the Catford/Crofton Park area.

Implementation of the Sustainable Streets measures began in Catford and Crofton Park in October 2023. Residents and businesses in the areas where the programme is being rolled out in full will receive more information via post about implementation, including information about how to apply for a parking permit if needed. Residents and businesses in new controlled parking zones will be entitled to a 15% discount for the first year of their parking permit.

Phase 1: Deptford

We consulted people in Deptford on proposals for their area in Spring 2023. The introduction of a parking permit scheme for roads in Deptford was proposed to help alleviate parking pressures in the area and ensure parking is prioritised for local residents and businesses, as well as discouraging unnecessary car journeys and reducing traffic and congestion. Alongside the introduction of a parking permit scheme, we proposed a series of improvements to local streets and the introduction of more sustainable transport measures in Deptford. The proposals included new street trees, safer crossing points, electric vehicle charging points, secure cycle storage and car club bays.

The results of the consultation and updated recommendations were presented to Mayor and Cabinet on 19 July 2023, taking into account feedback received during the consultation. Mayor and Cabinet approved proposals to roll out the programme in full across Deptford, with detailed plans for individual streets updated in response to feedback from residents and businesses. 

Following a statutory consultation on the draft traffic orders and consideration of comments and objections, implementation of the Sustainable Streets measures across the whole Deptford has received formal approval. Residents and businesses will receive further information via post about next steps and timelines for implementation. 

Updated plans for roads in Deptford will be available to view on this webpage shortly. Read more about the updated proposals for Deptford.

Phase 1: Evelyn and New Cross Gate

In August and September 2023, we consulted residents and businesses in Evelyn and parts of New Cross Gate on proposals for their area.

The introduction of a parking permit scheme for Evelyn and parts of New Cross Gate was proposed to help alleviate parking pressures in the area and ensure parking is prioritised for local residents and businesses, as well as discouraging unnecessary car journeys and reducing traffic and congestion. Alongside the introduction of a parking permit scheme, we proposed a series of improvements to local streets and the introduction of more sustainable transport measures in Evelyn and parts of New Cross Gate. The proposals included safer crossing points, electric vehicle charging points, secure cycle storage and car club bays.

Taking into account the consultation responses and the wider aims of the Sustainable Streets programme to reduce traffic and congestion, improve road safety, reduce air pollution and lower carbon emissions, proposals to roll out the Sustainable Streets programme across the majority of roads in the consultation zone were approved by Mayor and Cabinet in December 2023, with designs for individual streets updated in response to consultation feedback. Given the consultation feedback received from roads to the north of Deptford Park, the Sustainable Streets programme will not be rolled out on these roads.

Consultation feedback also showed that people felt improving safety at junctions would improve their road. As a result, it is proposed that double yellow lines will be introduced at junctions on all roads which formed part of the consultation zone in Evelyn and New Cross Gate, including roads in the area to the north of Deptford Park.

Following Mayor and Cabinet approval, traffic orders will be published in May 2024 and subject to a period of statutory consultation. Following consideration of any comments and objections, if a decision is taken to proceed then implementation of the new measures would be expected to begin from July 2024.

Residents and businesses on roads where the programme is being rolled out will be written to with further information ahead of implementation, including details about how to apply for a parking permit or request a space in a cycle hangar. Residents and businesses in new controlled parking zones will be entitled to a 15% discount for the first year of their parking permit.

Read more about the updated recommendations for Evelyn and New Cross Gate.

Parking reviews: Lewisham Central, Blackheath and Rushey Green West

Residents and businesses in Lewisham Central (Zone B), Blackheath (Zone BHA) and Rushey Green West (Zone E) were asked to share their views on parking permit schemes in their area, as part of the Sustainable Streets programme. As well as reviewing existing parking arrangements, we asked what other sustainable transport measures and improvements people would like to see on their street, such as more street trees, safer crossing points, cycle hangars, electric vehicle charging points and car club bays.

The consultation closed on 1 October 2023 and we are currently analysing the results of the consultation survey in order to inform next steps.

Parking reviews: Deptford Central, Deptford South, Elverson and Ladywell

Residents and businesses in Deptford Central (Zone S), Deptford South (Zone DS), Elverson (Zone G) and Ladywell (Zone T) were asked to share their views on existing parking permit schemes in their area, as part of the Sustainable Streets programme. As well as reviewing existing parking arrangements, we asked what other sustainable transport measures and improvements people would like to see on their street, such as more street trees, safer crossing points, cycle hangars, electric vehicle charging points and car club bays. 

The consultation for these areas closed on 21 January 2024 and we are currently analysing the results of the consultation survey in order to inform next steps.

Request or review a CPZ

If you are concerned about parking displacement on your street, you can register your interest in a controlled parking zone for your road or a review of a CPZ

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the aim of the Sustainable Streets programme?

We want to reduce the number of car journeys in Lewisham and encourage more people to walk, cycle or use public transport. This will help to reduce air pollution, traffic and congestion, improve road safety and lower carbon emissions, helping tackle the Climate Emergency and creating a nicer environment for local people.

To achieve this, we want to create streets that encourage people to travel more sustainably, discourage unnecessary car journeys and make better use of road space and pavements.

With unrestricted parking on 75% of roads in the borough, improving parking management is vital for reducing the number of unnecessary car journeys and tackling traffic, congestion, and air pollution. Introducing parking permit schemes helps discourage unnecessary car journeys and ensures parking is prioritised for local residents and businesses.

Alongside the introduction of parking permit schemes, our Sustainable Streets programme proposes a series of improvements to local streets and investment in sustainable transport measures, including more street trees, safer crossing points, electric vehicle charging points, secure cycle storage and car club bays.

Why are parking permit schemes being proposed?

Parking permit schemes aim to ensure parking is prioritised for local residents and businesses and reduce unnecessary car journeys into and around the borough.

Parking pressures can vary road to road. While some people may find it easy to park on their street, many residents have difficulties parking near their home, particularly on roads close to train stations, event destinations or high streets. Parking permit schemes help to ensure residents can park near to their home.

With a parking permit scheme in place, commuters and visitors will be more likely to travel to the area by walking, cycling or using public transport, helping reduce traffic and pollution and improving road safety.

The introduction of parking permit schemes also provides the space and funding needed to invest in sustainable transport measures and improvements to local streets.

Is it possible to introduce the sustainable transport measures and improvements proposed without parking permit schemes?

No - the introduction of parking permit schemes will generate the funding needed to invest in sustainable transport measures and creates the space required to make these improvements to local streets.

What is the money from parking permits spent on?

Money from the parking permit schemes proposed will fund the new sustainable transport measures and improvements to local streets, including more street trees and planting, secure cycle storage hubs, electric vehicle charging points, car club bays and safer crossing points.

All funds raised from parking restrictions are ring-fenced for local transport and highways improvements, including active travel initiatives and discounts on travel, such as Freedom Passes for older and disabled residents who travel via public transport.

How much do parking permits cost?

On average, the cost of an annual residential parking permit is around £10 a month.

The cost of a parking permit is calculated based on the emissions of a vehicle. You can check how much a parking permit would cost for your vehicle using our online permit calculator tool.

In areas where new parking permit schemes are introduced, residents and businesses will receive a 15% discount on the cost of their annual permit for the first year. With this discount, resident parking permits will cost £8-9 a month on average.

Blue Badge holders in areas with a parking permit scheme can apply for a free annual resident permit.

Carers of residents in areas with a parking permit scheme can also apply for a free carers permit, allowing them to visit free of charge for up to four hours.

I don’t have a problem parking on my road – why do we need a parking permit scheme here?

Parking pressures can vary road to road. While some people may find it easy to park on their street, many residents have difficulties parking near their home, particularly on roads close to train stations, event destinations or high streets. Parking permit schemes help to ensure residents can park near to their home.

In order to avoid displacing non-residential parking onto nearby roads that do not currently experience significant parking pressures, we normally take an area-wide approach when introducing new parking permit schemes. This approach has been successfully implemented in other areas across the borough and can help to reduce parking pressures on certain roads without negatively impacting other residents.

Introducing new sustainable transport measures also requires reallocating road space currently used for car parking. The introduction of parking permit schemes alongside these sustainable transport measures will ensure that the remaining road space available for car parking is prioritised for local residents and businesses.

Parking permit schemes also encourage commuters and visitors to travel to the area by walking, cycling or using public transport, helping reduce traffic and pollution and improving road safety across the whole area.

What about people who need to drive?

While we want to reduce the number of car journeys in Lewisham, we know some people still need to drive, such as people with mobility impairments or people who need to drive for work.

Parking permit schemes still enable residents to own a car and park near their house, while encouraging those who can, to make more journeys on foot, by bike or on public transport.

Blue Badge holders in areas with a parking permit scheme are able to apply for a free annual permit. We are also proposing to install more disabled bays in locations where they have been requested by residents, making it easier for people with mobility issues to park near their home.

The proposals also include the installation of more car club bays, helping people who need to make occasional journeys by car, but may not own a vehicle.

Will people still be able to visit me by car?

Yes - anyone can still drive to a home or business in areas with a parking permit scheme. If someone is visiting an area outside the hours of permit parking operation, they can park anywhere free of charge.

If they are visiting during the hours permit parking is in operation, they will need to park in one of the dedicated pay-and-display zones – located on every street – or use a visitors permit provided by a resident within the area. Visitor permits are for one time use and allow visitors to park in permit bays nearby to the home they’re visiting.

Residents with a parking permit receive ten one-hour visitor permits for free and additional visitor permits can be purchased as needed, starting from £1.80 per hour.

Ten one-hour visitor passes will also be provided free of charge to any resident who is over 60 in receipt of Council Tax support and does not have another parking permit.

Pay-and-display bays or visitor permits can be used by tradespeople when needed.

How much do visitor permits cost?

A book of 10 one-hour visitor permits is included in the cost of an annual residential parking permit. The current cost of additional visitor permits is as follows:

  • book of 10 one-hour permits: £18 (£1.80 per hour)
  • half-day permit (up to five hours): £4.50
  • day permit: £7.00
  • week permit: £30.00

Carers of residents in areas with a parking permit scheme can also apply for a free carers permit, allowing them to visit free of charge for up to four hours.

Any resident aged over 60 who is in receipt of Council Tax support will also be provided with a free book of 10 one-hour visitor permits.

How will these proposals impact local businesses?

Our Sustainable Streets programme aims to make it easier for people to walk, cycle or use public transport to get to local shops and high streets, helping support local businesses.

The introduction of new parking permit schemes and short-stay parking bays will encourage greater turnover of parking near busy shopping locations, making it easier for other residents who need to drive to visit local shops and high streets.

We would encourage local business owners to fill out the consultation survey so that we can hear their views and ensure our Sustainable Streets programme meets their needs. We are also carrying out face-to-face consultation with local businesses in the consultation area to ensure they have the opportunity to share their views.

When would the parking permits operate if they went ahead?

We want to have a consistent approach across Lewisham and most parking permit schemes in the borough operate 9am-5pm.

As part of the consultation, we will be asking residents what days of the week they think permit parking would be most useful. 

We will use the results of the consultation, along with parking monitoring surveys, to identify times and days for the proposed parking permit scheme.

My street isn’t included in the consultation area - will I have a chance to be involved?

We have plans to consult the whole borough in phases. We are starting in areas where our data shows streets are often congested with parked cars and will aim to consult the whole borough as quickly as possible.

I live in a car-free development - will I be able to purchase a residential parking permit?

As part of the planning obligations of car-free developments, residents are not permitted to hold or apply for a parking permit. It is recognised that for car-free developments outside of existing CPZs, these planning obligations have not been enforced previously and some residents may own a vehicle despite the terms of their residence.

To assist with the transition period, residents of car-free developments in areas where new parking permit schemes are being introduced will be able to purchase a parking permit for up to 18 months.

As well as introducing parking controls to improving parking management and reduce traffic and congestion, the measures being introduced as part of the Sustainable Streets programme also include more cycle hangars, car club bays, new street trees, safer junctions and electric vehicle charging points. These measures will help enable people to make more journeys by walking and cycling and support a shift away from higher polluting modes of transport.

The provision of car clubs near car-free developments will also support residents who may need to make some journeys by car, without owning a vehicle personally.